All About MIG Welding

MIG Welding: The Basics For Mild Steel

A versatile option for your fabrication and maintenance/repair needs

MIG welding is an arc welding procedure in which a continuous strong wire electrode is fed through a welding gun and into the weld swimming pool, signing up with the two base materials together. Shielding gas is also sent out through the welding weapon and secures the weld pool from contamination. MIG stands for metal inert gas. The trade name for it is a gas metal arc welding (or GMAW), and the slang name for it is wire welding.

The MIG procedure allows the home-hobbyist, artist, farmer/rancher, motorsports lover or Do It Yourself welder to make most types of fabrication and maintenance/repair welds on material from 24-gauge up to 1/2-inch thick. In addition to versatility, many individuals turn to MIG welding due to the fact that they’ve heard that it’s a simple procedure to learn.

MIG

Here are some advantages to MIG welding:

  • The capability to join a vast array of metals and thicknesses
  • All-position welding capability
  • A great weld bead
  • A minimum of weld splatter
  • Easy to find out

Here are some drawbacks of MIG welding:

  • MIG welding can only be utilized on thin to medium thick metals
  • The use of an inert gas makes this kind of welding less portable than arc welding which requires no external source of protecting gas
  • Produces a rather sloppier and less controlled weld as compared to TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas Welding).

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Why MIG Welding Is Better Than TIG Welding?

MIG and TIG welding both use an electrical arc to produce the weld. MIG (metal inert gas) welding uses a feed wire that constantly moves through the weapon to create the trigger, then melts to form the weld.

DIVERSITY.

A number of reasons make MIG welding the exceptional choice for your task. Initially, it’s more diverse. While TIG welding can be used on more kinds of metals, it’s restricted in its efficiency on thicker tasks. MIG welding can be used on aluminium, stainless steel and steel, and on every density from 26-gauge sheet metal to durable structural plates.

SPEED.

Another reason for choosing MIG vs. TIG is speed. Oppositely, TIG welding is a much slower process that’s focused on detail.

EXPENSE.

Just like any manufacturing job, time equals cash. And due to the fact that the MIG welding process is so much faster, it’s also more cost-effective. MIG parts are also more readily offered and far more economical than TIG.

Is MIG welding unsafe?

The primary hazards from MIG welding are electrical, arc radiation, and welding fumes. Other hazards include inert gas, heat, noise, and fire. Welding fumes include both particulate and gaseous types. The MIG welding process is the most common welding procedure now used in production.

MIG welding is generally thought-about to be the very best technique for the majority of steel applications. Many bow down before the superiority of stick and flux welding when it comes to thicker steel sheets. TIG welding and MIG welding can be used without any real issue if the steel is stainless and mild.

Does MIG Welding Require Gas?

Can any Mig be used for Gas AND Gasless Welding? No, a Mig Welder will be designed to either use Wire with Gas, Self Shielding (gasless) Wire, or both (Gas/No Gas).

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